HFFNY presents Classics to Keep You Company

A new digital series that brings the masters of Cuban and Latin American Cinema to your home

The cinema has been, at times, a fun antidote to many an ailment, the starting point at which we make a diagnosis of the world. At other times, it’s a microscope to see in detail our societies and sociopolitical maladies. While it might not be the cure for all ills (least of all a virus) we still think that in this spring of 2020, when it’s hard to see the light at the end of the tunnel, it may be the best way to spend our time at home. On that note we are excited to share with you our new digital series of some of our most beloved classic movies to keep you company while you practice social distancing.

New links are posted every Wednesday, so stay tuned, stay safe, stay calm and enjoy the show!

PIXOTE: A LEI DO MAIS FRACO

PIXOTE: THE LAW OF THE WEAKEST

Hector Babenco | Brazil | Fiction | 1981 | 128min

As the weather heats up and summer gets going, take a trip to the streets of Sao Paulo with #HFFNY’s next recommendation in its digital series of Classics to Keep You Company: PIXOTE (1981). Golden-globe-nominated and named one of the top 5 Latin American movies of the past 50 years after its release, Argentine/Brazilian master of socially conscience filmmaking Hector Babenco’s potent look at lost youth fighting to survive on the bottom rung of Brazilian society helped put the country’s cinema on the international map.

STREAMING HERE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

NOW!

Production: ICAIC | Director: Santiago Álvarez | Photography: Archives | Music: Song, Now! performed by Lena Horne | Editing: Norma Torrado, Idalberto Gálvez | Sound: Adalberto Jiménez | 6min

“The message of this song’s not subtle / No discussion no rebuttal” – Lena Horne (Now!)

#HFFNY recommends NOW! by revolutionary Cuban editor Santiago Alvarez, who pioneered the videoclip as a simultaneous art form and social tool, as its next Classic to Keep You Company. Made 55 years ago, and as relevant as ever, we’ll let the film speak for itself:

STREAMING HERE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

RETRATO DE TERESA 

PORTRAIT OF TERESA

Pastor Vega | Cuba | Fiction | 1979 | 103min

A topic as relevant as ever is what #HFFNY recommends for this week on its Classics to Keep You Company digital series. Retrato de Teresa (1979), a pivotal movie in Cuban cinema and directed by one of the island’s most beloved filmmakers, Pastor Vega, “hit home” for a lot of Cubans, as it was the first film to deal with the role of women in the domestic sphere since the passage of the Family Code in 1974. Starring silver screen legend Daisy Granados as the titular Teresa, this story of a woman eschewing sexist double standards while holding a full-time job, leading a community dance troupe and getting the kids to school on time serves as a worthwhile companion for a rainy Thursday afternoon.
STREAMING HERE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

EL ÁNGEL EXTERMINADOR 

THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL

Luis Buñuel | Mexico | Fiction | 1962 | 93min

Things get (sur)real in El ángel exterminador / The Exterminating Angel#HFFNY’s next recommended Classic to Keep You Company. From the satirical mind of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time, Luis Buñuel, comes a quarantine story gone wild. When a group of sophisticated party guests discover there’s an invisible force preventing them from leaving the room, things take a bizarre turn in this savagely funny social critique.
STREAMING HERE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

ALSINO Y EL CONDOR 

ALSINO AND THE CONDOR

Miguel Littin | Nicaragua | Fiction | 1982 | 90min

While the world takes the necessary steps for us to go outside and meet again, #HFFNY recommends a work of cinematic poetry from one of the most compelling filmmakers of all time, Chilean Miguel Littin. Nominated for an Oscar in 1983, the Nicaraguan film Alsino y el cóndor reimagines military occupation from the dreamy perspective of a 12-year-old boy. And like the titular Alsino, whose flights of fancy are actual flights, the idea of spreading wings and taking off sounds great right now… even if just for 90 minutes.
STREAMING HERE WITH OPTIONAL ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

AHÍ ESTÁ EL DETALLE 

YOU’RE MISSING THE POINT

Juan Bustillo Oro | Mexico | Fiction | 1940 | 109min

“The first obligation of all human beings is to be happy. The second obligation is to make others happy” (Cantinflas) While laughter may not cure a virus, it’s what we’ve been craving these last couple of weeks. The next film #HFFNY recommends in its digital series of Classics to Keep you Company stars the legendary Mexican comedian known worldwide as Cantinflas. Considered one of his best films, Ahí está el detalle (You’re Missing the Point) is a hilarious tale of mistaken identities that cracks us up every time.
STREAMING HERE WITH OPTIONAL ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

VAMPIROS EN LA HABANA 

VAMPIRES IN HAVANA

Juan Padrón | Cuba | Fiction | 1985 | 69min

This March we lost a legendary figure of Cuban animation, Juan Padrón. As an homage, #HFFNY is recommending his darkly funny (and delectably raunchy) Vampiros en La Habana (Vampires in Havana) as the next film in our digital series of classics to keep you company. So pour yourself a glass of something nice (be it vampisol or some vintage O+), and join us for an outlandish vampiric turf war set to the steamy sounds of Latin Jazz. Streaming here in Spanish with English subtitles
STREAMING HERE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

LA MUERTE DE UN BURÓCRATA 

DEATH OF A BUREAUCRAT 

Tomás Gutiérrez Alea | Cuba | Fiction | 1966 | 84min

In need of a feature-length laugh? Then join HFFNY for the fifth film in its digital series of classics to keep you company.Cinematic genius Tomás Gutiérrez Alea was a master at finding comedy in even the most infuriating circumstances, and La muerte de un burócrata (Death of a Bureaucrat), his absurdist farce about a young man trying to fight the system, proves the perfect mix of surrealist satire and slapstick humor for a side-splitting critique of bureaucracy run amok and the tyranny of red tape.
STREAMING HERE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

BLACK GOD, WHITE DEVIL (1964)

Glauber Rocha | Brazil | Fiction | 118min

Curl up at home and escape to Brazil with HFFN’s fourth film in our digital series of classics to keep you company. Moviemaking mastermind Glauber Rocha directed Black God, White Devil (1964) at the age of 25, and today it’s a must-watch for any film buff.

So if you find yourself in need of a break from the world for 2 hours, join us in the Brazilian badlands of the 1940s as we follow outlaws Manuel and Rosa on their quest to find some sort of home, only to discover that the land belongs to neither god nor the devil, but to the people themselves (in Portuguese w/ English subtitles): https://youtu.be/4C7Sfn3EmGk 

LOS OLVIDADOS (1950)

Luis Buñuel | Mexico | Fiction | 78min

HFFNY invites you on a feature-length trip to Mexico with its third film in our digital series of classics to keep you company. Iconic Spanish director Luis Buñuel’s pivotal work, Los olvidados / The Young and the Damned (1950), blends the stark reality of marginalized Mexican youths with surrealist dreamscapes to create an award-winning film that became a bedrock of future Latin American cinema.

Buñuel’s masterpiece, newly-restored and subtitled in English, is streaming for free on Amazon Prime (also available to rent for $2.99): https://amzn.to/3b5N84A

ESTA TIERRA NUESTRA / THIS LAND OF OURS (1959)

Tomás Gutiérrez Alea | Cuba | Doc | 19min

Next up in HFFNY’s series of time-honored classics to keep you company while you practice social distancing is a bite-sized doc by Cuba’s most ingenious filmmaker, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea (aka Titón). A striking portrayal of land inequality for the campesinos of Cuba’s countryside, this short deftly marries the realities of the present with dreams for tomorrow.

EL MÉGANO (1955)

Julio García Espinosa | Cuba | Doc | 25min

Grab the popcorn and get cozy! To kick-off HFFNY’s series of classic films to keep you company while you practice social distancing, we present EL MÉGANO (1955) the impactful short doc by beloved Cuban director Julio García Espinosa that paved the way to Cuba’s revolutionary cinema.